About

London Mining Network (LMN) is an alliance of human rights, development, environmental and solidarity groups.

We work for
·    human rights, including the rights of Indigenous Peoples and workers, and
·    sustainable development (development which meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs)
in communities around the world affected by the activities of mining companies based in or funded from London

We do this by
·    Monitoring abuses of human rights, Indigenous rights and workers’ rights in mining-affected communities, and seeking redress;
·    Research into the impacts of mining on human rights, the environment and sustainable development;
·    Raising awareness of the impacts of mining on human rights, the environment and sustainable development;
·    Promoting public support for the rights of mining-affected communities;
·    Promoting respect for human rights and the environment by mining companies;
·    Advocacy on mining, human rights, the environment and sustainable development;
·    Working to eliminate infringements of human rights by mining companies and bodies working in support of mining companies.

Why?

Mining is one of the most polluting industries in the world. It is linked with conflict and human rights abuses. Most of the world’s biggest mining companies, and many smaller mining companies, are listed on the London Stock Exchange, and on its Alternative Investment Market (AIM). For more information on London’s key role in the global mining industry, see our Mining and London page.

How we can work together with you

We are happy to provide speakers for meetings and events.

We produce electronic newsletters, on average once every two weeks, packed with information about London-linked mining companies. Sign up for the newsletters and you will also receive information about actions, events and reports.

For further information
·    phone 07903 851695
·    email us on contact[at]londonminingnetwork.org,
·    or write to us at
London Mining Network,
Finfuture,
225-229 Seven Sisters Road,
London N4 2DA.

Members of London Mining Network include

ACTSA (Action for Southern Africa)

Biofuelwatch

CATAPA (Comite Academico Tecnico de Asesoramiento a Problemas Ambientales)

Coal Action Network

Colombia Solidarity Campaign

The Corner House

Corporate Watch

ECCR (Ecumenical Council for Corporate Responsibility)

Environmental and Social Change

Eritrea Focus

Forest Peoples Programme

Gaia Foundation

Global Justice Now (formerly World Development Movement)

LAMMP (Latin American Mining Monitoring Programme)

Partizans (People Against Rio Tinto and its Subsidiaries)

TAPOL (the Indonesia human rights campaign)

Scottish Opencast Communities Alliance

Society of St Columban

UK Tar Sands Network

War on Want

Member groups Down to Earth (The International Campaign for Ecological Justice in Indonesia) and PIPLinks (Philippine Indigenous Peoples Links) have recently ceased functioning, but maintain their websites as a source of useful information. Coal Action Scotland has also now been wound up.

LMN’s eleven associate member groups include leading human rights, environmental and development organizations.

London Mining Network is a Passionist Partner and a Partner of Banktrack.

In order to join LMN, potential members and associate members are required to confirm their agreement with the following Statement of Purpose.

The London Mining Network recognises that
* Most of the world’s biggest mining companies, and many smaller mining companies, are listed on the London Stock Exchange, and on its Alternative Investment Market (AIM).
* London is the world’s biggest centre for investment in the minerals industry: British high street and investment banks invest hundreds of millions of pounds a year in scores of mining projects across the globe.
* The mining industry’s key lobbying organisation, the International Council on Mining and Metals (ICMM) is based in London. So are the world’s most important metals price fixing mechanism, the London Metal exchange, and the leading precious metals trader, the London Bullion Market Association (LBMA).
* Mining is one of the most polluting industries in the world; has a disproportionately negative impact on land-based communities, especially Indigenous Peoples, and is frequently associated with forced evictions, militarisation, conflict and human rights abuses.
* Use of coal in energy generation is a major contributor to destructive climate change; use of uranium produces a radioactive legacy which threatens the wellbeing of thousands of generations to come.

The London Mining Network is a network of organisations concerned about human rights, social justice and the ecological integrity of the planet. It seeks to:
* Enable organisations concerned about the impacts of London-based mining companies to share information and learn from each others’ experience.
* Conduct and facilitate research into mining companies, mining processes, mine impacts and mine finance and make that research available to the public.
* Draw public attention, especially in Britain, to the negative impacts of London-listed mining companies, through publications and events.
* Support communities and workers directly affected by the activities of London-listed mining companies and London-based finance by publishing their experiences and views, providing them with relevant information, enabling them to send representatives to London company AGMs, supporting their demand for re-examination of mining contracts, and in other ways as appropriate.
* Ensure that mining projects not be allowed to proceed without recognition of land title for mining-affected communities.
* Ensure that mining projects not be allowed to proceed without demonstrable public acceptance by those directly affected by them and, in the case of Indigenous Peoples, without recognition of their legal right to Free Prior Informed Consent.
* Invite public support for campaigns to ensure that mineral development practices are consistent with goals of sustainability, human rights and ecological justice.

London Mining Network recognises that many mining companies are also involved in other extractive industries and aims to work co-operatively with groups and networks concerned about these industries.

London Mining Network charitable objects

(1) To promote human rights, including but not limited to the rights of Indigenous Peoples and workers (as set out in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and subsequent United Nations conventions and declarations, including the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples) in mining-affected communities throughout the world

and

(2) To promote sustainable development (that is, development which meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs) in such mining-affected communities

by all or any of the following means:
Monitoring abuses of human rights, Indigenous rights and workers’ rights in mining-affected communities;
Obtaining redress for the victims of such abuse;
Relieving need among the victims of such abuse;
Research into the impacts of mining on human rights, the environment and sustainable development;
The dissemination of such research to the public;
Providing advice to government and others on the mining industry’s impacts on human rights, the environment and sustainable development;
Commenting on proposed legislation affecting mining companies, mining finance, and mining’s impacts on human rights, the environment and sustainable development;
Raising awareness of the impacts of mining on human rights, the environment and sustainable development;
Promoting public support for the rights of mining-affected communities;
Promoting respect for human rights and the environment by mining companies;
International advocacy on mining, human rights, the environment and sustainable development;
Eliminating infringements of human rights by mining companies and bodies working in support of mining companies.

In furtherance of that object but not otherwise, the trustees shall have power

To engage in political activity provided that the trustees are satisfied that the proposed activities will further the purposes of the charity to an extent justified by the resources committed and the activity is not the dominant means by which the charity carries out its objects.

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